Why leadership coaching is needed now more than ever

As we enter the third month of the global pandemic, the crisis continues and uncertainty remains high. These unprecedented times amplify the VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity) environment in a way that we could never have imagined a few short weeks ago. And while budgets are cut and spending scrutinized,… Read More

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Canopy Advisory Group Gives an EDGE to Consultant Community

New Platform Addresses the Needs of the Growing Independent Workforce
According to a recent NPR/Marist poll, one in five jobs in America is held by contract workers, and within a decade half the American workforce could be contractors and freelancers. Canopy Advisory Group, a consulting firm that matches high-level advisers with employers who require specialized expertise, is offering EDGE, a new, premium service that supports independent consultants’ practices.

“We listened to feedback from our consultant advisers and reviewed market and behavioral trends to determine how Canopy could most effectively meet the expressed needs of our team. The opportunity to collaborate with other highly skilled colleagues was at the top of their list.” Read More

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Business of Aging

Canopy Advisory consultant Karen Larsen, second from right, works with a team at Graebel, which includes Gen X'ers, millennials and boomers. Photo by Kathleen Lavine, Denver Business Journal

Baby boomer Karen Larsen used to be afraid to talk about her grandson at work because it would draw attention to her age. Now, she has now found an encore career where her years of experience as a chief marketing officer are wildly sought after. Read More

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Denver’s ​Canopy Advisory Group hires new CEO amid expansion plans

Canopy Advisory Group, a network of independent business consultants, today announced that is has hired Chaun Powell at its new CEO.
Powell will join Griffen O'Shaughnessy, who co-founded the Denver-based firm with Brooke Borgen. O'Shaughnessy — who was also named a DBJ Outstanding Women in Business finalist in 2016— heads Canopy's Denver operations. Canopy also has an office in Seattle.

"With the success of Seattle and continued growth in Denver, there was also need to grow our leadership team," O'Shaughnessy said. "Chaun is an outstanding business leader with nearly two decades of experience in health-care startups and Fortune 25 companies. He is filled with ideas to help Canopy realize its next-stage client partnerships, and I couldn’t be more thrilled for the Canopy brand, our clients, and our consultants on this addition." Read More

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Two Women, One Vision

The immigrant founders behind Fresh Monster are taking a new approach to working motherhood
As moms with years of experience in the personal care industry, launching Fresh Monster—a line of affordable, toxin-free bath products for kids—was a natural career progression for co-founders Jean Sim and Irena Todd. However, as immigrants who were born into very different circumstances, the story of how these two entrepreneurs came together to create a thriving business is remarkable. Read More

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The Gig Economy: Your Ticket To Sourcing Top Talent

Canopy Advisor and Forbes contributor Liesa Taylor.

The gig economy isn’t just for ride-sharing services and odd jobs. Smart leaders are taking advantage of it to source highly qualified knowledge workers — and, with a little preparation, you can too. Here's how.

The first step is to learn a bit about the gig economy.

The freelance economy grew to 55 million Americans this year — 35% of the nation’s workforce. This trend doesn’t just exist among service workers. We also see it among professionals who have been trained at tops schools and firms. Why? There are a few reasons:

• Talented workers, historically employed on a full-time basis, are dropping out of the full-time labor force. This is happening across generations: baby boomers who don’t want (or can’t afford) to fully retire, Gen Xers who need flexibility to raise kids and care for aging parents, and millennials who seek more freedom and independence in their work. Read More

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The rise of the “highlancer”: Working moms eschew the C-suite for flexibility

It’s often said glass ceilings and the old boys’ club keep successful women from reaching the corner office as the pinnacle of their careers.  But do today’s working moms want to be a CEO?

For many women, the grueling years that are most critical to reach the corner office overlap with the years to start and raise a family.  Frequently, trying to accomplish both leads to feeling stress and lack of fulfillment in both arenas.  Choose your career and compromise on your family time; choose your family, and you’re likely to be passed over for executive growth.

A subset of today’s working moms – who had previously chosen the C-suite path toward the executive chair – are creating a new conversation about what it means to have it all.  A recent Harvard Business Review article reported today’s working women want more meaningful work, more challenging assignments and more opportunities for career growth, but cited job titles and similar status concerns – such as being in the C-suite – as less relevant. Read More

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Why I Followed My Personal Calling, Even When It Led Away From A Great Job

I realized over 10 years ago that I have a calling that cannot be ignored — a calling to create opportunities for the next generation of leaders in under-represented communities. After years as a corporate communications executive, I saw an opportunity for my employer to be a more socially responsible company, generate positive news stories, and support public policy goals by creating partnerships with leaders of under-represented communities. After all, these growing communities are the users, customers and supporters of the companies that serve them. But the notion of working closely with them was unfamiliar to leadership primarily because they are not represented in decision-making roles.

As an executive at a Fortune 500 company, I created a new role focused on developing a network of relationships and partnerships with under-represented 
communities. The idea was supported and after several years, there were tangible outcomes for the public policy, human resources, and diversity teams and noted benefit to company value. There was also significant progress in the community as a result of our collective work together. At last, I was able to fulfill my personal calling while contributing to the good of the company. This calling eventually led me to Facebook. Read More

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Who Wins in the Gig Economy, and Who Loses

The winners and losers in the U.S. economy have traditionally been easy to identify. If you had a full-time job, you won. A full-time job provided the steady income needed to support our traditional version of the American Dream: the highly leveraged, high-fixed-cost house; the cars; the latest consumer goods. A full-time job was also the only way to access important employer-provided benefits, such as health insurance and a pension, as well as protections against workplace injuries, discrimination, and harassment. Without a full-time job, a true sense of security was elusive, benefits were inaccessible, and you were more likely to be stranded on the fringes of the labor market, observing rather than living the American Dream. Read More

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Is This Wildlife Conservation PhD The Steve Jobs Of Impact Investing?

Did the people who met Steve Jobs in 1976 have any inkling that they were talking to the person whose name would for a generation be synonymous with “entrepreneur”? More often, people have believed to have found the next incarnation of Jobs only to be disappointed. Perhaps you can help me determine if the subject of this article could become the Steve Jobs of impact investing.

From my perch in Salt Lake City on the west side of the Rockies, over the last few years I’ve been hearing rumblings from the other side of the mountains. In Denver, Dr. Stephanie Gripne has created one of the most dynamic centers of impact investing and social entrepreneurship in the world. With a goal to catalyze impact investments of over $1 trillion and a plan to get there, it is about time that people outside the Rocky Mountains took note.

Dr. Gripne founded the Impact Finance Center as a partnership between the University of Denver’s Daniels College of Business and the Sustainable Endowments Institute, a special project of Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. Read More

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